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Almost everyone occasionally complains about their job. However, if you're a lumberjack, groundsman, or truck driver, you may have bigger concerns than most.

These are among the most dangerous workplaces in America, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Statistics latest annual report on fatal accidents at work, reflecting data from 2019.

Overall, the U.S. recorded 5,333 work-related deaths this year, up 2% from a year earlier – and the largest number since 2007.

Transportation accidents accounted for 2,122 of these work-related deaths. These were by far the most common fatal events. The second most common fatal incident – falls, slips and trips – caused 880 deaths.

Other causes of work-related deaths include violence such as murder; Contact with objects and devices, e.g. B. hit by a falling object; Exposure to harmful substances or environments; and fire and explosions.

Below are the jobs that are riskiest because of their fatal accident rates.

10. Floor maintenance

Mowing the lawn can be an easy and hassle-free way to make some cash this summer.From StockWithMe / Shutterstock.com

Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 19.8 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

9. Farmers, ranchers and other agricultural managers

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Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 23.2 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

8. Structural iron and steel workers

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Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 26.3 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

7. Driver / salesman and truck driver

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Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 26.8 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

6. Garbage and recyclable material collectors

Garbage collector and truck.Kzenon / Shutterstock.com

Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 35.2 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Even the pay stinks in this job. See how much garbage and recycling collectors collect in every state for yourself.

5. Help in the construction industry

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Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 40 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

4. Roofers

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Fatal Injury Rate for This Job: 54 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

3. Airplane pilots and flight engineers

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Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 61.8 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

2. Lumberjack

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Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 68.9 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

1. Fishing and hunting workers

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Fatal injury rate for this occupation: 145 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Fatal injury rate in all occupations: 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time equivalents

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, sometimes we get compensation for clicking links in our stories.

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